Anna Jornet – Île

Anna Jornet

Île

Some years ago this family decided to move to a house isolated in the mountains. Île walks along the world they have built for themselves, trying to understand its essence while taking distance from the collective imaginary of this way of living. So throughout their silence and intimacy Île explores the implications of choosing a life out of the social norm and in contact with nature, focusing on the encounter with oneself, the dreams, the yearning to discover and the family’s identity. Île conceives nature like they have shown me, as part of the human being, as a space that determines the perception of time and nourishes inner observation, curiosity and creativity. This project raises considerations about the concepts of freedom and isolation –given their double nature of physical condition and state of mind- and how they transcend into love, fears, the relationship with nature and innocence.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Anna Jornet Puig (Girona, Spain, 1983). Initially graduated in Economics and Law. Later, after being fascinated by the photographs of William Eggleston and Graciela Iturbide, Jornet decided she wanted to become a photographer so she enrolled at the Documentary Photography Centre in Barcelona (CFD Barcelona) and at El Observatorio (Barcelona). Jornet been one of the recipients of Can Basté Foundation Grants –for an individual exhibition in Barcelona- and she has been selected to participate in Descubrimientos PhotoEspaña 2017. Her project Île has been exhibited at PA-TA-TA Festival, the Emergent Photography Festival of Granada, and it will be soon exhibited at DOCField Barcelona 2017 and at Encontros da Imagem of Braga 2017.

 

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Anna Jornet

Sophie Barbasch – Fault Line

Sophie Barbasch

Fault Line

Fault Line is a project I am doing in the small coastal town of Brooklin, Maine. The protagonist is my younger cousin Adam, who lives there. I also photograph my brother, father, and other cousins. I chose the title because a fault line alludes to where the earth splits in an earthquake (a metaphor for a divided family with a complicated history) and also alludes to fault, or blame (I wonder, how does a family support each other, even when things aren’t perfect?). My goal is to show the weight we all carry and how we are both connected and isolated from each other.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Sophie Barbasch is a photographer based in New York City. She earned her MFA in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design and her BA in Art and Art History from Brown University. Selected grants and residencies include the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, the Blue Mountain Center, and a Fulbright Fellowship to Brazil.

 

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Sophie Barbasch

Haruka Sakaguchi – Original New Yorkers

Haruka Sakaguchi

Original New Yorkers

Author Tom Slater describes gentrification as a “spatial expression of economic inequality.” It is, in short, the process by which middle and upper class residents and investors take over a predominantly working and lower-middle-class neighborhood, displacing former residents and altering the social fabric of the community. Processes of gentrification have often been conflated with terms such as “urban renewal” and “revitalization” while invoking devastating consequences for working and lower-middle-class residents of major cities. Original New Yorkers is an ongoing portrait series of New York natives who have been affected by gentrification.

Subjects are shot in their homes or workplaces and asked to submit a handwritten note, either depicting the way gentrification has affected them personally or an “open letter” addressing newcomers to New York City.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Haruka Sakaguchi is a Japanese photographer based out of Brooklyn, New York. Her work focuses on cultural identity, otherness, and sense of place. Haruka was born in Osaka, Japan. Her family immigrated to the United States when she was three months old. In 2013, Haruka received a Bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the University of British Columbia. Since then, her work has taken her to various corners of the world where she has produced both personal and editorial work. Haruka uses photography to challenge monolithic interpretations of a culture or community. She has worked with a wide range of subjects, from the Muslim community in the tri-state area to residents of Jeffrey City, a former uranium mining town in central Wyoming. Haruka also returns to her home country regularly to work on an ongoing portrait series documenting hibakusha, or A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

 

 

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Haruka Sakaguchi

Anneke Paterson – Bitten by the Moon

Anneke Paterson

Bitten by the Moon

“There is a saying used in El Salvador that is rooted in mysticism; when the birth of a child with a birth defect is observed, family and doctors will say, “mordido por la luna” – or ‘bitten by the moon’, to explain the visible anomaly. In El Salvador, there is a significant population of people that will likely never be able to receive the surgical treatment they need for birth defects and other severe physical conditions alike. The barriers to access extend beyond income and socioeconomic standing — often surgeons will refuse treatment because they lack the specialized skill, equipment, or adequate teams to take on more complex procedures. Many of those that are able to afford their surgeries are denied them anyway; surgeons face challenges within the government in seeking funding and advocating for better equipment. These factors deeply and detrimentally affect those that need specialized surgical care in their personal lives. Many that have a distinct physical deformity or affliction are nearly barred from their communities, and are ostracized if they are not able to contribute to society in the expected ways such as in production and labor. They face extreme difficulty beyond their physicality, and the emotional trauma that ‘being different’ implies– many are forced to travel internationally to the States or to Europe to receive their treatments. They lose their jobs, leave behind family and must find financial support to enable them to travel and stay out of their home country for significant periods of time. Those that are able to find help within their country may not make the “priority list”, meaning that although their condition may be severe, if they are stable, they must wait. These images illustrate the struggles behind this lack of service for the population of El Salvador and also brings to light the resilience of the people that must fight for necessary services. Many will fall through the cracks in a societal, governmental, and political system that is designed to serve only those that are healthy and “able-bodied”. While there are many factors at play here, I have chosen to focus on the people of El Salvador and their stories in hopes of providing answers to the question – what is life like with a physical deformity where help does not exist?”

 

 

 

 

Bio

Anneke Paterson was born with a rare syndrome which has required her to have multiple surgeries at different stages in her young life. It is from this background that Anneke has gained an acute interest in not only the evolving cultures of her generation, but in the healthcare of her generation. Anneke has visited families in El Salvador, Guatemala and México in search of understanding the implications of what is life like when there is little to no access to required surgeries, while already facing the socioeconomic challenges of poverty. Based in Austin, Texas, Anneke is currently attending college part time, working toward a bachelors in global health policy and anthropology. Anneke’s photographic work has been published by The New York Times, National Geographic Travel, National Geographic Books, and the Texas Tribune

 

 

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Anneke Paterson

Michalis Poulas – Infinite Perimeter

Michalis Poulas

Infinite Perimeter

The place where one draws breath and calls one’s home; ’tis whence one begins; The place one recalls and reminisces, be it in a positive or negative light, years down the line, even if one never left it, either physically or mentally; It exists as place, as time, as a past experience in one’s memory and imagination; ’tis the remains of this theme that jointly shape the way one feels; The spacetime one calls one’s home is under tremendous pressure, and the issue is with whom, why, and to what extent one is willing to share it.

Infinite Perimeter is a project about human identity as it exists within the current stage of capitalism. It is about the feelings of loss, loneliness and isolation that everyone can experience whether as actual immigrants or even into their homeland. It is about the sense of being exiled even from ourselves.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Michalis was born in Athens Greece in 1978. His father, a professional sailor, opened a one hour process film shop back in 1988 in Crete island as he tried to stay close to his family and that was his first contact with photography. Poulas studied at Leica Academy in Athens. Since 2003 he established and has been running his own photo-lab in Sitia, Crete where he lives. Photography was one of his strongest weapons against his drug addiction and he would make pictures in order to ease the pain and fear of death.

 

 

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Michalis Poulas

Karim El Maktafi – Hayati

Karim El Maktafi

Hayati

Hayati (“my life” in Arabic) is a visual journal realized exclusively with a smartphone. Hayati reflects on my identity as a second-generation Italian. Son of immigrants, born and raised in Italy, balance between two realities that at first sight might seem incompatible. To produce this story, I became both its subject and its object. I was born in Desenzano del Garda, a village near Brescia, Italy, from Moroccan parents. Growing up between two worlds forced me to sharpen my gaze and to compare these perspectives which often diverge from each other. Embracing a single identity is not easy; feeling out of place or like an odd cultural hybrid often happens. Yet, while trying to define this identity, one understands the privilege of “standing on a doorstep” at the edge of two environments. One can decide who to be, where to belong, or to create new ties, while keeping alive the experiences learnt along the path. One must learn to juggle multiple languages, cultural taboos, references, prohibitions, and learn to teach those who are not also standing on the doorstep. I had to travel inside my own life and family. I faced doubts, hesitations and afterthoughts, but I realized an honest portrait of how I have lived until today. The most interesting aspect of this story — of my story — is the creation of a less restricted reality. One that is undefined, in which various beliefs and experiences thrive and form a unique harmony. Hayati was made between Italy and Morocco during a year-long scholarship at Fabrica, Benetton Group’s communication research centre based in Treviso, Italy.

 

 

 

 

Bio

Karim El Maktafi is an Italian-Moroccan photographer born in Desenzano del Garda (IT) in 1992. In 2013 he graduated from the Italian Institute of Photography in Milan. He has collaborated with several photographers in various fields: commercial, fashion, editorial production and major advertising campaigns. His photographic research explores the concept of identity through through documentary methods and portraiture. His work has been presented in exhibitions at the Brescia Photo Festival, the Festival of Ethical Photography, Fotografia Europea, Fotoleggendo, Area35 Art Gallery in Milan and YES Collective in Auckland, and has been featured in magazines such as Internazionale, Vice, Topic stories, Playboy Italia, C-41 and Spam, among others. He has also received the Alessandro Voglino Young Talent Prize at the FRAME Foto Festival. Between 2016 and 2017, during his residency at Fabrica, Karim realized the project “Hayati”, winner of PHM 2017 Grant – New Generation Prize, and shortlisted for the CAP Prize 2017 – Contemporary African Photography prize.

 

 

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Karim El Maktafi

Elton Gllava – Where The Crows Would Have Sung

Elton Gllava

Where The Crows Would Have Sung

“Had it not been for the chrome, here the crows would have sung” said the old man by the side of the dusty road. He spoke of Bulqizë, and of its people who work in the mines. Bulqizë is a small town in North-East Albania known as the town of the miners . Following the discovery of chrome there in 1939 and the opening of the first mines in 1948, Bulqizë has now become the world’s third largest producer of this mineral.The first time I went to Bulqizë was in 2013. I knew nothing about this place. My first impact with this strange town was overwhelming. A first encounter that took me back in time. The grey buildings of the main street outlined a town which had stopped in time, crystalized in the atmosphere of the Albania of my childhood. There were many bars, a few grocers, betting shops, biliard halls, a couple of restaurants and two schools. I stayed there two days taking pictures of mines and miners. The feeling I got when I began to develop the films was as intense as the one i experienced when i first set eyes on the town. Alternating emotional surges from the heart and mind, suspended in time. So for the past three years I have been trying to tell the story of this slice of Albania which seems to be transfixed in the past and yet catapulted into the future by the unstoppable logic of exploitative capitalisim which knows no bounds. Through my photos I tell the story of a community sitting upon a “mountain of gold” which sees its resources and minds ceaselessly draining away. Bulqizë has been defined by some as a social ghetto. To me it represents a resevoir of cultural archetypes which I have endeavoured to capture.

 

 

Bio

Elton Gllava was born in Albania under the closed communist regime of the 1970’s. When the borders opened in 1991 he seized his opportunity to experience another world and like thousands of Albanians made the crossing Italy. His early years in Rome exposed him to some of the darker sides of multilayered Roman society through various pursuits and employments……however in 2007 he made the decision to dedicate himself to photography. His photographic style is focused towards both social and authorial reportage with a strong draw towards the intimate aspects.

 

 

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Elton Gllava

RIP Stanley Greene

 

Stanley Greene is gone. Dear friend, colleague, and a dedicated photojournalist to the core. Member of the prestigious NOOR @noorimages photo agency, Stanley most often pursued significant stories beyond the normal news cycles. When all other news outlets left Chechnya, Stanley stayed. He believed more in the story then he cared about running off to the next hot spot to get an assignment. His acclaimed book “Chechnya” the result. Stanley lived in my New York building for several years along with Paolo Pellegrin, Lorena Ros, Kadir Van Lohuizen, Alex Majoli, Thomas Dvorzak, Kerry Payne,Chris Anderson, Rob Clark, Monia Lippi, Tim Hetherington, David Coventry, Marion Duran, and Michael Christopher Brown. The karma was unbelievable .Stanley was in the center, part of the buzz, relentless in his effort to do the right thing. The real deal. You can’t buy “Black Passport”. Sold out long ago. I hope it gets re published. Testament to one of the finest chroniclers of our time. Big love Stanley 🎈

The EPF 2017 is open – Call For Submissions

Photo by Alejandro Chaskielberg, EPF 2009 winner

 

Emerging Photographer Fund 2017 – call for submissions

 

Burn Magazine revolves around the EPF. Our most important curatorial contribution to the oftentimes chaotic landscape of photography today. By choosing a jury whose lifetimes have been spent in looking at photographs and making photographs, we try to give our Burn readers a distilled version of the best work of all that flows before their eyes everyday.

Most importantly our mission is to give recognition to the finest emerging authors out there and to provide some funding to at least a few to keep going and to continue making a mark. Our previous recipients prove this is not in vain.

In addition since 2015 FujiFilm is partnering with us to offer several prizes for our category “Young EPF Award”. It’s open to all photographers who are 25 or younger (born on Jan 1st, 1992 or later).

All you need to do is enter into the EPF… and if you’re 25 or younger, you’ll be automatically eligible for the “Young EPF Award” as well. Fuji offers a cash prize of $5,000 to the winner of the “Young EPF Award”.

Of course we are immensely proud of this partnership… and hope in this way we can give back even more to the young emerging ones amongst us… who just might need it more than we can ever imagine.

This all gets added alongside our existing “main” EPF grant which is already $10,000… and both the EPF grant and the Young EPF Award are not mutually exclusive, so you could potentially win both… imagine that.

The EPF is accepting submissions until September 15th… submit your story… if ever there was a time to emerge, that time is now.

 

 

Call for submissions

 

The Emerging Photographer Fund 2017 is now open for submissions!

The deadline for entry is September 15th, 2017 (6pm PST)

 

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Emerging Photographer Fund 2017 – 10,000$

AND

The Young Talent EPF/FujiFilm Award – $5,000

The Young Talent EPF Award is sponsored by FujiFilm

FujiFilm

 

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Enter here!

The deadline for entry is September 15th, 2017 (6pm PST)

 

 

 

 

Previous EPF Winners

 

The 2008 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Sean Gallagher for his essay on the environmental Desertification of China.

The 2009 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Alejandro Chaskielberg for his 8×10 format essay on the Parana River Delta ‘The High Tide’.

The 2010 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Davide Monteleone for his essay ‘Northern Caucasus’.

The 2011 Emerging Photographer Fund grant was awarded to
Irina Werning for her essay ‘Back to the Future’.

In 2012 three Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Matt Lutton for his essay ‘Only Unity’ and
two minors to Giovanni Cocco for his essay ‘Monia’ and to Simona Ghizzoni for her essay ‘Afterdark’.

In 2013 four Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Diana Markosian for her essay ‘My Father The Stranger’ and
three minors to: Iveta Vaivode for her essay ‘Somewhere on Disappearing Path’,
Oksana Yushko for her essay ‘Balklava: The Lost History’ and
Maciej Pisuk for his essay ‘Under The Skin; Photographs From Brzeska Street’.

In 2014 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
one major to Alessandro Penso for his essay ‘Lost Generation’ and
one minor to: Birte Kaufmann for her essay ‘The Travelers’.

In 2015 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
the EPF grant Danila Tkachenko for the essay ‘Restricted Areas’ and
the FujiFilm/Young Talent Award: Sofia Valiente for the essay ‘Miracle Village’.

In 2016 two Emerging Photographer Fund grants were awarded:
the EPF grant Annie Flanagan for the essay ‘Deafening Sound’ and
the FujiFilm/Young Talent Award: Aleksander Raczynski for the essay ‘Views’.

 


The Emerging Photographer Fund was created and is directed by David Alan Harvey,
and curated by Anton Kusters & Diego Orlando, with Francesca Gennari.